Monday, September 12, 2005

Chief Justice as Umpire

I liked Judge Roberts' opening remarks, but his analogy comes up short:

Judges and justices are servants of the law, not the other way around. Judges are like umpires. Umpires don't make the rules; they apply them.

The role of an umpire and a judge is critical. They make sure everybody plays by the rules.

But it is a limited role. Nobody ever went to a ball game to see the umpire.


Mr. Chairman, I come before the committee with no agenda.

I have no platform.

Judges are not politicians who can promise to do certain things in exchange for votes.

I have no agenda, but I do have a commitment. If I am confirmed, I will confront every case with an open mind. I will fully and fairly analyze the legal arguments that are presented. I will be open to the considered views of my colleagues on the bench. And I will decide every case based on the record, according to the rule of law, without fear or favor, to the best of my ability. And I will remember that it's my job to call balls and strikes and not to pitch or bat.

Sometimes, when a player or manager behaves so contemptibly and outside the bounds of decency, it is the umpire's job to run him out of the game. The Chief Justice doesn't quite get to do that. That power resides with the fans, as it should.

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